Forms of qualitative research

A researcher uses tenets of autobiography and ethnography to do and write autoethnography.

Forms of qualitative research

Adorable animal families that will make you "aww" Qualitative and quantitative research are the two main schools of research, and although they are often used in tandem, the benefits and disadvantages of each are hotly debated. Particularly in the social sciencesthe merits of both qualitative and quantitative research are fought over, with intense views held on both sides of the argument.

It is generally agreed upon, however, that there are some phases of research where one or the other is clearly more useful than the other, and so few people completely dismiss either.

Quantitative research is probably the least contentious of the two schools, as it is more closely aligned with what is viewed as the classical scientific paradigm.

Quantitative research involves gathering data that is absolute, such as numerical data, so that it can be examined in as unbiased a manner as possible. There are many principles that go along with quantitative research, which help promote its supposed neutrality.

Quantitative research generally comes later in a research project, once the scope of the project is well understood.

Qualitative Research

Ad The main idea behind quantitative research is to be able to separate things easily so that they can be counted and modeled statistically, to remove factors that may distract from the intent of the research.

A researcher generally has a very clear idea what is being measured before they start measuring it, and their study is set up with controls and a very clear blueprint.

Tools used are intended to minimize any bias, so ideally are machines that collect information, and less ideally would be carefully randomized surveys. The result of quantitative research is a collection of numbers, which can be subjected to statistical analysis to come to results.

Remaining separate from the research emotionally is a key aspect of quantitative research, as is removing researcher bias. For things like astronomy or other hard sciences, this means that quantitative research has a very minimal amount of bias at all.

For things like sociological data, this means that the majority of bias is hopefully limited to that introduced by the people being studied, which can be somewhat accounted for in models. Quantitative is ideal for testing hypotheses, and for hard sciences trying to answer specific questions.

Qualitative researchon the other hand, is a much more subjective form of research, in which the research allows themselves to introduce their own bias to help form a more complete picture. Often the data presented from qualitative research will be much less concrete than pure numbers as data.

Instead, qualitative research may yield stories, or pictures, or descriptions of feelings and emotions. The interpretations given by research subjects are given weight in qualitative research, so there is no seeking to limit their bias.

At the same time, researchers tend to become more emotionally attached to qualitative research, and so their own bias may also play heavily into the results. Within the social sciences, there are two opposing schools of thought.

One holds that fields like sociology and psychology should attempt to be as rigorous and quantitative as possible, in order to yield results that can be more easily generalized, and in order to sustain the respect of the scientific community.

Another holds that these fields benefit from qualitative research, as it allows for a richer study of a subject, and allows for information to be gathered that would otherwise be entirely missed by a quantitative approach.

Forms of qualitative research

Although attempts have been made in recent years to find a stronger synthesis between the two, the debate rages on, with many social scientists falling sharply on one side or the other.Qualitative research uses a descriptive, narrative style; this research might be of particular benefit to the practitioner as she or he could turn to qualitative reports in order to examine forms of knowledge that might otherwise be unavailable, thereby gaining new insight.

Types of Qualitative Data This module will provide an overview of the most common types of data collection methods used in qualitative research studies. It also includes an assessment of the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

Main Types of Qualitative Research. Case study. Attempts to shed light on a phenomena by studying indepth a single case example of the phenomena. The case can be an individual person, an event, a group, or an institution. Grounded theory. In qualitative research, only a sample (that is, a subset) of a popula- tion is selected for any given study. The study’s research objectives and the characteristics of the. Qualitative research methods are continually evolving, as patterns and styles of human interaction and communication change. Current research may include: Face-to-face, telephone, or online exchanges.

In particular, they wanted to concentrate on ways of producing meaningful, accessible, and evocative research grounded in personal experience, research that would sensitize readers to issues of identity politics, to experiences shrouded in silence, and to forms of representation that deepen our capacity to empathize with people who are.

Main Types of Qualitative Research. Case study. Attempts to shed light on a phenomena by studying indepth a single case example of the phenomena. The case can be an individual person, an event, a group, or an institution. Grounded theory. [Qualitative research is] research using methods such as participant observation or case studies which result in a narrative, descriptive account of a setting or practice.

Text Analysis: Text analysis is a research method that is a bit different from other qualitative research methods as this method uses researchers to analyze the social life by decoding the words and images from a piece of the document or other similar forms like film, music etc.

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