Book reviews for the help

The Help by Kathryn Stockett An interesting and historical look at Jackson, Mississippi and family interactions in the turbulent '60s.

Book reviews for the help

Skeeter tries to behave as a proper Southern lady: She plays bridge with the young married women; edits the newsletter for the Junior League; and endures her mother's constant advice on how to find a man and start a family.

However, Skeeter's real dream is to be a writer, but the only job she can find is with the Jackson Journal writing a housekeeping advice column called "Miss Myrna. Aibileen works tirelessly raising her employer's child Aibileen's seventh one and keeps a tidy house, yet none of this distracts her from the recent loss of her own son who died in an accident at work while his white bosses turned away.

Two events bring Skeeter and Aibileen even closer: Skeeter is haunted by a copy of Jim Crow laws she found in the library, and she receives a letter from a publisher in New York interested in Skeeter's idea of writing the true stories of domestic servants.

Skeeter approaches Aibileen with the idea to write narratives from the point of view of 12 black maids. Aibileen reluctantly agrees, but soon finds herself as engrossed in the project as Skeeter.

They meet clandestinely in the evenings at Aibileen's house to write the book together as the town's struggles with race heat up all around them.

Aibileen brings in her best friend, Minny, a sassy maid who is repeatedly fired for speaking her mind, to tell her story, too. Hearing their stories changes Skeeter as her eyes open to the true prejudices of her upbringing.

Aibileen and Minny also develop a friendship and understanding with Skeeter that neither believed possible.

Book Review: The Help by Kathryn Stockett

Along the way, Skeeter learns the truth of what happened to her beloved maid, Constantine. Constantine had given birth, out of wedlock, to Lulabelle who turned out to look white even though both parents were black. Neither the black nor the white community would accept Lulabelle, so Constantine gave her up for adoption when she was four years old.

When the little girl grew up, she and Constantine were reunited. While Skeeter was away at college, Lulabelle came to visit her mother in Jackson and showed up at a party being held in Skeeter's mother's living room. When Charlotte Phelan discovered who Lulabelle was, she kicked her out and fired Constantine.

Constantine had nowhere else to go, so she moved with her daughter to Chicago and an even worse fate.

Book reviews for the help

Skeeter never saw Constantine again. Skeeter's book is set in the fictional town of Niceville and published anonymously. It becomes a national bestseller and, soon, the white women of Jackson begin recognizing themselves in the book's characters. Hilly Holbrook, in particular, is set on vengeance due to the details in the book.

Hilly and Skeeter grew up best friends, but they now have very different views on race and the future of integration in Mississippi. Hilly, who leads the Junior League and bosses around the other white women in the town, reveals to Stuart, Skeeter's boyfriend, that she found a copy of the Jim Crow laws in Skeeter's purse, which further ostracizes Skeeter from their community.

- The Washington Post

In the end, it is a secret about Hilly that Minny reveals in Skeeter's book that silences Hilly. The book becomes a powerful force in giving a voice to the black maids and causes the community of Jackson to reconsider the carefully drawn lines between white and black.The Help is a tale of lines, color, gender and class, in the Jackson, Mississippi of the early s.

This is a world in which black women work as domestics in white households and must endure the whims of their employers lest they find themselves jobless, or worse/5.

The Help is one of those perfect movies for parents and mature tweens/teens to see together. It sparks discussion, teaches a history lesson, and makes everyone think about how we treat others. It sparks discussion, teaches a history lesson, and makes everyone think about how we treat others. I originally read the audio book edition of "The Help" by Kathryn Stockett and later read it on my Kindle for book club.

The Help is most definitely on my short list for all time favorite books. I am not sure which was better the audio book or the Kindle read.

Common Sense says

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Book Reviews The Help by Kathryn Stockett: review Toby Clements is impressed by a debut novel set in the segregated Deep South of the Sixties, reviewing The Help . Gush, gush, gush, gush, gush! I cannot gush enough about this book. The Help, by Kathryn Stockett, follows the lives of three women living in Jackson, Mississippi.

Two of the women, Aibilene and Minny are black, hired as help to wealthy, or trying to appear wealthy, white families/5.

THE HELP by Kathryn Stockett | Kirkus Reviews